Priority Actions


Defining the resource theme areas

The South West NRM Regional strategy groups the region’s assets into the six theme areas as defined here. The current regional priorities under each theme can be viewed by clicking on the icon or theme heading below.

 

TerrestialBiodiversity

Terrestrial biodiversity

The totality of all living species and ecosystems found on and in the land and in the air of the South West NRM region, including along the banks of rivers, lakes and wetlands, but not including aquatic species and ecosystems. It includes all native terrestrial species, habitats, ecosystems and communities (including native bushland, heath-lands and caves), whether privately or publicly managed and includes all mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, insect, plant and fungal species and soil microbes that occur in the region, while acknowledging that there is some overlap with the aquatic life-cycle stages of some species such as amphibians. The theme area also includes all native forests of the region, whether protected (and managed for their biodiversity values) or managed for timber production.

 

AquaticBiodiversity

Aquatic biodiversity

The totality of all living species and ecosystems found in the inland aquatic habitats of the South West NRM region, including their genes. It includes all native aquatic species, habitats, ecosystems and communities found in the region, whether privately or publicly managed, while acknowledging that there is some overlap with the terrestrial life-cycle stages of some species such as frogs. Separated from terrestrial biodiversity as management responses are unique and these species, habitats, ecosystems and communities are poorly understood in comparison to those of the terrestrial zone.

 

WaterResources

Water resources

All aquatic systems found in the South West NRM region, whether natural or man-made, whose use may require enforcement of user-rights or ownership, economic control and market valuation. It refers to all inland waters, and includes all waterways (flowing surface waters including estuaries, rivers, streams, creeks, drains and floodplains), wetlands (permanent, seasonal or intermittent standing surface water including lakes, swamps, damplands, sumplands, springs, soaks, estuaries, karst caves and waterholes) aquifers and other underground water found in the region. The term “estuaries” refers to those assets requiring management actions to deal with threats that originate upstream from the assets, as distinct from “estuaries” in the theme area Coastal environments (see below). There will on occasion be some overlap with the theme area “Aquatic biodiversity”.

 

LandResources

Land resources

All land, soils and landscapes of the South West NRM region that have been modified since European settlement through various forms of land use and development. It includes all land resources that are used to produce goods of value to humans, including remnant vegetation and agro-forestry on public and private land. The theme area does not include native forests of the region, as these are public assets that may or may not have been modified through logging – these are included in the theme area “Terrestrial Biodiversity”.

 

CoastAndMarine

Coasts and the marine environment

The totality of all living species and ecosystems found along the coasts, in estuaries and in the marine environments of the South West NRM region. It includes the beaches and the cliffs and dune systems backing them, as well as the marine environment within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) extending up to 200 nm (373 km) from the shore [1]. The asset “estuaries” refers here only to those ecosystems and species that require management action to deal with local threats, although there may on occasion be some overlap with estuaries in the theme area “Water resources”.

 

Culture

Communities and culture

This includes all aspects of both Nyungar and non-Aboriginal culture and history as it pertains to NRM, as well as all people and communities that now call the region home. Significant sites range from landscapes to landmarks, and from sites to buildings that have heritage significance for current and future generations.

 

[1]       See http://www.ga.gov.au/marine/jurisdiction/maritime-boundary-definitions.html for further details.

 

Image by Tim Swallow.